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Holy Terror

What is metal for you?

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I'm happy to answer questions. I have no peripheral vision at all. The central vision I do have isn't great. It also takes me a while longer then normal adjusting from light to dark and vice versa. If an area is very poorly lit I won't be able to see at all. The condition is degenerative and will eventually lead to total blindness but as each case is different there's no sure fire way of determining how long my sight will actually last. I think knowing that makes me appreciate my sight more.

 

I totally get where you're coming from with regards to metal. It's what draws me to funeral doom so much - there's powerful emotion behind that music.

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Something perhaps slightly odd in this topic but "metal for me" actually points to specific places.  Kind of hard to put into words but a lot of the time when I listen to metal I think of the streets around where I used to work.  I would spend most of my lunch hour sat in my car reading metal mags and listening to metal, therefore they are images that (oddly) play through my mind when I listen to metal.  Also my parents house, where I first discovered metal sits in my head a lot when I have the music going.

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Nostalgia's great, innit? I have nearly the same experience, although it's more about specific moments for me - walking through Chinatown on a hot summer day blasting Satyricon's "Rebel Extravaganza" and looking at faraway buildings through hazy air; a specific (productive) day in my first life drawing class at college with "Still Life" on the headphones; rounding a corner on elevated train tracks in Queens, surrounded by the empty tops of residential buildings, with Voices' "London" seeming like the perfect backdrop. Laying on my couch in my old apartment the first time I heard the "Various Failures" edit of Swans' "Why Are We Alive", I felt like I was floating. 

I really miss having more free time and privacy to enjoy music in that way. With the exception of "London", I haven't had the right combination of environment, mood, and musical atmosphere in years. 

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I don't get a lot of that in my music generally. The times when I do tend not to be positive either tbh. It's why I tend to avoid the dsbm scene - it puts me straight into the mindframe from the very worst periods of my battle with depression.

 

Having said that the other day walking through the city whilst Maiden's 'The Prowler' was playing - pretty cool.

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I'm going to necro this thread, cause it's such a good one. 

I think that metal is one of the greatest music genres in existence. While most other music genres is very much restricted, metal can just be about anything, or almost any play style. Different metal sub-genres has the ability to inspire, and make you feel a wide range of emotions, be it inspiring, happy or jolly, sad or melancholic. 

I can't imagine my life not listening to metal. Metal has been there in hard and happy times and it has helped me come to terms with anger and sadness. I regularly listen to metal, pretty much every day, and if I go over extended periods without listening to metal I can get pretty grumpy and negative.  

 

"Without music, life would be a mistake." Friedrich Nietzsche
 

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Before I was introduced to metal I had heard a ton of music. Rock, hard rock, jazz, pop, country, classical, even rap..... But none of it spoke to me and entered into my soul. When I heard my first distorted power cord I felt something, like I had finally found someone who spoke my language. I felt my heart skip a beat and time stopped... I was in Love.

Now 10 Years later I am still on my heavy metal journey and I get a thrill when I meet fellow brothers and sisters in metal. I feel Like a child tasting candy for the first time whenever I find a new band. I do not like driving, but heavy metal makes it awesome! I'm not a workaholic, but heavy metal makes me want to work harder! I'm was never an outgoing individual, but metal makes me get out there and want to experience life! Metal is the juice to my Battery. Heavy Metal is not just my music, it is who I am.

 

\m/

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On 2016-2-14 at 10:33 AM, FatherAlabaster said:

Nostalgia's great, innit? I have nearly the same experience, although it's more about specific moments for me - walking through Chinatown on a hot summer day blasting Satyricon's "Rebel Extravaganza" and looking at faraway buildings through hazy air; a specific (productive) day in my first life drawing class at college with "Still Life" on the headphones; rounding a corner on elevated train tracks in Queens, surrounded by the empty tops of residential buildings, with Voices' "London" seeming like the perfect backdrop. Laying on my couch in my old apartment the first time I heard the "Various Failures" edit of Swans' "Why Are We Alive", I felt like I was floating. 

I really miss having more free time and privacy to enjoy music in that way. With the exception of "London", I haven't had the right combination of environment, mood, and musical atmosphere in years. 

This. 

As pointed out in my Top 10 History Metal post in the 'Top 10 of Any Given Genre' thread (check it out), what metal offers me personally is something much more than music, and even something more than a great atmosphere. It's often a connection with an existing interest I have, like history, or partying, girls, or philosophy. That's why the lyrics of any given album/band are important to me too because they reinforce this vibe. 

As far as places and music going together - big time. I've been lucky to travel around a bit (I've been the wild rover for many a-year, and I spent all me money on whisky and beer). Highlights include listening to Norwegian black metal while on a boat in the Norwegian fjords; walking around the streets of Oporto and Lisbon listening to Moonspell (The 'Sin/Pecado' album is exclusively good for this with its strong exotic feel), and climbing the ancient Israeli fortress Masada (besieged and eventually conquered by the Romans) before the dawn listening to Fleshgod Apocalypse's 'Labrynth' album - something I'll never forget. 

Metal sounds great by itself, but it really complements 'life' as well. 

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I have to say, although I don't want to sound overly dramatic or whatever, metal music is really an important pressure valve for me. It helped me a lot of times in my life to overcome things and find the strength when other stuff didn't work, and it still does. I also have to create metal music because that's the only way I can vent myself and clean my head from frustration and anxiety, gives me the release and satisfaction that I really can't find somewhere else and it really helpes me to think healthy and live my life in a healthy way. So, it becomes more of necessity rather than just having fun. I mean, it's fun, but it's also more than that. I'm really happy that I found something like that in my life. 

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I like (and love) a lot of non-metal music as well, to the extent that it can get me into ecstasy, but with metal (especially black metal) there is often a sensation (maybe a realization, or maybe just an illusion) of a deep understanding on a level that unites both philosophy and emotion, which I seldom have with other music.

An attempt at self-reflection: I'm a person who, confronted with a problem, or even just a task that needs to be done, always starts with giving a synopsis of everything that possibly could go wrong. By doing this, I have all these possibilities off my chest and they don't bother me afterwards, but other people often find this very annoying, and seem to think it is like inviting bad omen (which I find ridiculously superstitious). Maybe this is why I feel so connected with the alleged negativity in black metal...

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