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New Purchases/Acquisitions


BlutAusNerd
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Birthday presents to me (last week, but I've been away from the forum for the most part): From BAN and his lovely wife: Pig Destroyer - Book Burner (another great PD album, more streamlined and brutal than Phantom Limb, although less memorable) Voivod - Target Earth (kinda like a more technical Nothingface, some seriously savage riffs/leads) From me to myself (haha): Seven Sisters of Sleep - Opium Morals (sludgecore done right, fast parts and ritualistic atmosphere) Full of Hell - Rudiments of Mutilation (crazy noise-grind with emphasis on the "-core" aspects) ... I need to get more Morbid Angel. I LOVE the guitar tone on Gateways.

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Re: New Purchases/Acquisitions

Birthday presents to me (last week, but I've been away from the forum for the most part): From BAN and his lovely wife: Pig Destroyer - Book Burner (another great PD album, more streamlined and brutal than Phantom Limb, although less memorable) Voivod - Target Earth (kinda like a more technical Nothingface, some seriously savage riffs/leads) From me to myself (haha): Seven Sisters of Sleep - Opium Morals (sludgecore done right, fast parts and ritualistic atmosphere) Full of Hell - Rudiments of Mutilation (crazy noise-grind with emphasis on the "-core" aspects) ... I need to get more Morbid Angel. I LOVE the guitar tone on Gateways.
Gateways probably features their heaviest guitar tone, but it's still not as bright and upfront as on Altars. I love the crunch on Altars, and combine it with their best songs and Vincent's sickest vocal performance, and you have one of the best and most influential death metal albums of all time. Sent from my HTC PH39100 using Tapatalk 2
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This morning I nipped into town (I am on a rare day off today) and picked up: Iron Maiden "No Prayer For The Dying" and "Fear Of The Dark" on CD and also picked up "The Best Of Diamond Head" on CD too. Also because it is my birthday tomorrow the girlfriend just bought me "Louder Than Hell : The Definitive Oral History Of Metal" by Jon Wiederhorn & Katherine Turman. Looking forward to this as I have heard good things about it and I am familiar with Wiederhorn's work over many years.

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This morning I nipped into town (I am on a rare day off today) and picked up: Iron Maiden "No Prayer For The Dying" and "Fear Of The Dark" on CD and also picked up "The Best Of Diamond Head" on CD too. Also because it is my birthday tomorrow the girlfriend just bought me "Louder Than Hell : The Definitive Oral History Of Metal" by Jon Wiederhorn & Katherine Turman. Looking forward to this as I have heard good things about it and I am familiar with Wiederhorn's work over many years.
Never heard of that documentary, let me know how it is, as most that I've seen (even the better ones) are full of holes and misinformation.
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Never heard of that documentary' date=' let me know how it is, as most that I've seen (even the better ones) are full of holes and misinformation.[/quote'] Actually it's a book, my bad for not explaining it proper. The "oral" bit comes from it largely plotting the development of the genre by using excerpts from interviews from Blue Cheer, MC5 and Iggy all the way through to Scott Ian, Rob Halford and Lars Ulrich and even the likes of Corey Taylor, Trent Reznor & Rob Zombie. Unfortunately Dave Mustaine is in it too so there will be doubtless political opinion and conspiracy thrown in for good measure. It seems to cover all genres barring Power Metal (at a quick glance) and even gives Industrial Metal, Nu-metal and Metalcore a chapter each so seems pretty up to date.
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Actually it's a book' date=' my bad for not explaining it proper. The "oral" bit comes from it largely plotting the development of the genre by using excerpts from interviews from Blue Cheer, MC5 and Iggy all the way through to Scott Ian, Rob Halford and Lars Ulrich and even the likes of Corey Taylor, Trent Reznor & Rob Zombie. Unfortunately Dave Mustaine is in it too so there will be doubtless political opinion and conspiracy thrown in for good measure. It seems to cover all genres barring Power Metal (at a quick glance) and even gives Industrial Metal, Nu-metal and Metalcore a chapter each so seems pretty up to date.[/quote'] That's kind of what I figured. Just about all of them take a straight jump towards nu-metal/metalcore after the 80's/early 90's and tend to skim over or skip completely the development of extreme metal. Also, it seems that power metal (as you had said), progressive metal after the 80's, and doom metal almost always get skipped as well. It would just be nice if these guys would paint he whole picture, I wouldn't be as annoyed with the inclusion of the mainstream stuff if they actually showcased the underground's development alongside it.
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Frustratingly they seem to skip doom (barring the usual chapter on Sabbath) unless it is included elsewhere. The documentary (changing media I know) "Metal Evolution" was the most comprehensive look at the genre more or less as a whole that I have seen to date. The only notable vacancy was the really extreme stuff like DM, grind, goregrind, deathgrind etc. I did read somewhere that Sam Dunn wanted to include these but the tv guys wouldn't fund them. Still was a decent watch - didn't teach me much of anything new but entertaining.

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Frustratingly they seem to skip doom (barring the usual chapter on Sabbath) unless it is included elsewhere. The documentary (changing media I know) "Metal Evolution" was the most comprehensive look at the genre more or less as a whole that I have seen to date. The only notable vacancy was the really extreme stuff like DM' date=' grind, goregrind, deathgrind etc. I did read somewhere that Sam Dunn wanted to include these but the tv guys wouldn't fund them. Still was a decent watch - didn't teach me much of anything new but entertaining.[/quote'] His movies tend to be shit, but Bill Zebub's black metal documentary was actually pretty good. He had the great idea of having no narrative, asking questions to black metal musicians off camera and filming their responses, so as to get the most honest and least guided answers possible. Also, since it's coming right from the musicians playing it from all across many different black metal subgenres, it paints an interesting picture. Some things they agree on, others they don't, it's just a cool showcase of ideas from across the spectrum. He has a few other documentaries that I need to check out as well.
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I don't actually think Sam Dunn's documentaries are that bad, some glaring ommissions and undue attention in certain places but as a whole passable, at least he's trying to do the genre justice. Global Metal was perhaps his finest work, actually cut out the perhaps, Global Metal is his finest work. Speaking of metal documentaries has anyone seen the doco about Pentagram? saw it on iTunes and thought it could be interesting but I don't want to be disappointed.

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I caught a great documentary on Youtube the other week from a program that used to go out on BBC2 over here years ago called Arena. It was like some culture/arty documentary that looked at different aspects of music, literature, film etc. Anyway there was one on metal and featured in depth footage of Bill Steer and Shane Embury from Napalm Death in their bedroom explaining the sound of death metal and grind. Priceless.

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I don't actually think Sam Dunn's documentaries are that bad, some glaring ommissions and undue attention in certain places but as a whole passable, at least he's trying to do the genre justice. Global Metal was perhaps his finest work, actually cut out the perhaps, Global Metal is his finest work. Speaking of metal documentaries has anyone seen the doco about Pentagram? saw it on iTunes and thought it could be interesting but I don't want to be disappointed.
Not seen the Pentagram doc - sorry can't comment.
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Most of the metal docos I've seen do their best to put a negative spin on the genre. It becomes rather frustrating when you're shown documentaries which attack the music you love and then have to defend your position against family members attempting an intervention though I have now found an excerpt which perfectly sums up my position which comes from the end of Metal: A Headbangers Journey. By far the most savage attack on metal I have seen was this old black metal doco which was actually re-named in the tv guide so I never did find out the original name but ultimately it was arguing that metal is a corrupting influence and that those who listen to black metal in particular are inevitably going to harm themselves and the people around them. Utter nonsense of course but the combination of imagery and language would be very effective in generating shock and horror amongst the ignorant and misinformed.

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I don't actually think Sam Dunn's documentaries are that bad, some glaring ommissions and undue attention in certain places but as a whole passable, at least he's trying to do the genre justice. Global Metal was perhaps his finest work, actually cut out the perhaps, Global Metal is his finest work. Speaking of metal documentaries has anyone seen the doco about Pentagram? saw it on iTunes and thought it could be interesting but I don't want to be disappointed.
My brother said Last Days Here, the Pentagram documentary, was really good. It was about the music and Bobby Liebling's drug addiction that has corrupted their chances at success a number of times.
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