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How it is to quit from metal?


Electromecanichal_machine
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There's a huge sense of drama to the is thread that points to some underlying problems.  I mean if you have stepped away from metal and your friends have turned away from you then it strikes me that they weren't good friends in the first place.  Taken at face value your posts suggest you were sick of your life given the theatre around the language you used (guessing English isn't your first language though so may appear more dramatic then you intend).

But it sounds like you're happy with your musical tastes now and you should never feel bad about evolving your listening habits.

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This happenned to me many times, I used to love metal and encourage it's ways more than others, until one day I got sick of everything and everybody, friends who used to be called as that, left me on my way. I tryied many times to open my way as a vocalist and my projects vanished in quick sand no matter how i tried. Now they see me progress on other genres, as they saw me progress on metal, and they care a damn about me. And I'm not a bad vocalist, I find my voice intresting and capable of complex things, and I'm an even better song writter, I had a couple of lyrics in metal that were good.
I regret not have learnt to play  guitar on those days, it would surely have helped, however nowadays that I know to play a little guitar  and years passed I don't feel like listening to old school metal in any variation, or dressing as a headbanger,

I 've got decepted by the scene and the music went repetitive and senseless, I still enjoy of distortion and speed but not strictly metal, I find Igorrr for example far more original than many metal bands. Respecting to living as a headbanger, many things of metal marked me and I still think almost the same about society, and how to behave in life, it's just that I don't feel all the violence and anger any more.

I know how it is, I know how many of you would feel about me, I've been that side, I was able to register this site at last without googling. It's still difficult to talk about this and I don't do it openly where my old pals can identify me, I just get past by that and sometimes manifest my actual musical taste: country and world music, better if heavy sounding (too much to ask) but never ever I will listen to pop or music too quiet.

3 minutes ago, NokturnalBoredom said:

I've never really quit, just gone through periods where I listened to more hardcore, post-punk, or electronic music. I don't think I could actually quit metal if I wanted to. As Mr. Lahey (Trailer Park Boys) would say "I am the metal, rand"

I got permanently burnt out of metal. I could listen to hardcore, trouble is I got tired of rock music in general, just always the same roots. I'd wish that there would be a genre similar to rock with different roots, may be that tell more about my country's traditions, but it's what it is, the genre I like doesn't exist yet, thoiugh i sometimes listem to some folk metal, just not the viking stuff. One thing it's sure and I'm never listening to pop music.

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3 hours ago, Electromecanichal_machine said:

know how it is, I know how many of you would feel about me

Truth be told, I really don't care what kind of music a person listens to. They can listen to mumble rap for all I care, caring about what music people enjoy is some 7th grade shit.

 

 

3 hours ago, Electromecanichal_machine said:

I got permanently burnt out of metal.

I occasionally go through periods where I don't listen to metal. My vinyl collection is widely varied. I have some stuff in there by country artists like Neko Case and Johnny Cash, some electronic stuff like Merx and Daft Punk, and a whole lot of punk, hardcore, and post-punk/gothic rock. I even have a little bit of hip-hop, I used to have more but I am burnt out on hip-hop for the most part. The only albums I have left in that genre are The Roots, Grandmaster Flash & the Furious Five, and The Sugarhill Gang. I used to have stuff by Wu-Tang, Common, Fugees, Notorious BIG, and KRS-One but I got burnt out on hip-hop much in the way that you got burnt out on metal when I quite smoking weed.

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@NokturnalBoredom I also got injured my ears twice, once while doing crazy chemistry experiments at home (you dont ignite hidrogen and cloride together), and more recently on the mosh (the last one I've been like ten years from now), I fell to ground and my head hit my ear with a bottle I was holding, basic kids stuff that you forget when you are drunk (don't run with a bottle), may be that's a part of it, not enjoying high notes of metal as it used to be, but anyway I appreciate the basic structure of metal even withoput hearing eat, Goddamn one of the things i miss more is the mosh, I still like that I think and I was good at it.

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I actually don't mosh anymore. I'm 35, way too old for that now and I don't even really go to shows anymore because there are never any good ones coming around the Tampa Bay area anymore. I also quit drinking like four years ago, so I don't have to worry about hurting myself when I am drunk (done that enough times in the past and broke some teeth doing it).

I don't listen to music that loud enough anymore but I think my hearing is already slightly damaged from the level I used to crank my car stereo to when I was younger. I wear a headset all day at work, so I always have people shouting right into my ear (I work fast food now, fell 16 feet off of a scaffold doing construction and can't really lift heavy objects anymore as a result). So I'm sure my hearing will go to shit eventually as a result.

I used to mosh quite a bit, but I went to a lot of hardcore and punk shows so it was mostly slamdancing rather than push-moshing or doing the shaolin monk routine. We all just sort of slammed around in a circle and bounced off of each other. I never got into push-moshing or pretending to be a ninja. But even when I did mosh, it wasn't an all the time thing, as I was way more interested in watching the bands play.

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Can you really "quit"? I don't think it should be a rational decision. Personally, I just listen to whatever I want. Sometimes I do listen to more blues, jazz or classical or electro or whatever catches my ear, or peeks my interest, but metal is just more prevalent on my playlists and I keep returning to it even if I do stray for a while. There's stuff in metal that I'm emotionally attached to, and even if it gets boring to me, sooner or later I will want to relive the emotions some albums have imprinted on me. Also, metal is kind of the musical language that I understand the most when compared to other genres. I cannot quit it, it will always be a part of me.

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On 11/18/2021 at 5:15 AM, PazaelSamuzu said:

Can you really "quit"? I don't think it should be a rational decision. Personally, I just listen to whatever I want. Sometimes I do listen to more blues, jazz or classical or electro or whatever catches my ear, or peeks my interest, but metal is just more prevalent on my playlists and I keep returning to it even if I do stray for a while.

Same here. I have a small collection of jazz and country records that I listen to at night when I am winding down (although some would argue that John Coltrane is not very good for winding down, but I disagree.) I have stuff like Neil Young, YES, Neko Case, and a lot of post-punk and goth stuff (Joy Division, the Cure, Siouxsie). But my primary collection of LPs and 7"s is metal, crust punk, and hardcore.

 

 

On 11/18/2021 at 5:15 AM, PazaelSamuzu said:

There's stuff in metal that I'm emotionally attached to

I'm emotionally attached to Nokturnal Mortum, Burzum, and Emperor. They remind me of a time when I had a lot more fun & actually had a social life. Now most of the time I'm either at work or sitting at home just listening to records. Lots of good times were had that those three bands provided a soundtrack for.


 

 

On 11/18/2021 at 5:15 AM, PazaelSamuzu said:

it will always be a part of me.

Same story here. The majority of LPs I have are metal LPs. It's just the music that provides the soundtrack to my life in the best way possible although like I mentioned, I do listen to other stuff.

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Can't say I've quit metal before, but I've had "more" or "less" metal moments throughout months. I've been a metalhead for 25 years and I seriously doubt I'll stop listening completely to this genre. It's so damn good and addictive.

One aspect I truly enjoy from metal is its diversity and global transcendence. Metal has been reinvented and adapted countless times. Literally every country has at least one band, in a heap load of languages... yeah, I'm willing to believe even the freakin' South and North Pole has metal bands consisting of penguins, walruses, exiled souls, aliens and whatever creature lurks in there. That's how great this genre has become over the years.

Nowadays, I combine my regular metal playlist with any stuff that catches my ear: blues, rock, jazz, punk, "banda" music (very popular/traditional in my country), fusion/tropical (thanks, Cynic), Darkwave, EBM, Aggrotech, Industrial, folk, Dungeon Synth, Dark Ritual, classical, rap and so on.

I don't have pals who like metal as much as I do. I'm ok with that. Some of them can't stand Iron Maiden for more than five minutes, hahaha.   

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