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When Did You First Get Into Metal?


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On 12/1/2021 at 12:47 AM, blaaacdoommmmfan said:

Your right Jason Becker was I've read inspired by paganini.think I got name right.  I will take your word about the others. Alex from children of bodom used to warm up playing Mozart. What a player he was. I love his live playing.  

Will look up the bands you mentioned thanks for that and I will let you know if I like them. Interesting names. 

High the memory by abyssic is cool. Death/doom with big orchestra bits. It's long but I like it. Also et moriemur album called epigrammata is very excellent. Gregorian chanting, choirs, cellos and other orchestral instruments meet death/ blackened doom in rather an amazing album. Both are on bandcamp. Both have cool artwork too

Cool. You like track  6 best from slows album. Incendaire. I like track 6 too alot👏👏👏. Good choice  track 7 is rather good imo. And as closer I like it alot

 

If you find these kind of things interesting, you could look up Igorrr. This artist plays almost every instrument you can think of and mixes metal with classical music, jazz, klezmer, break core and trip pop. Me personally, had never heard such music and I found it eye opening. 

Moriemur sounds interesting, will definitely check it out! Also very curious to hear Abyssic. I'm not very familiar with the underground metal artists, but very willing to learn, so thanks for all your input!

I liked track 7 too! Very nice closer, they definitely thought their album through. 

 

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On 12/5/2021 at 7:49 PM, Sterre said:

If you find these kind of things interesting, you could look up Igorrr. This artist plays almost every instrument you can think of and mixes metal with classical music, jazz, klezmer, break core and trip pop. Me personally, had never heard such music and I found it eye opening. 

Moriemur sounds interesting, will definitely check it out! Also very curious to hear Abyssic. I'm not very familiar with the underground metal artists, but very willing to learn, so thanks for all your input!

I liked track 7 too! Very nice closer, they definitely thought their album through. 

 

Slows track 7 is rather good, I just like the atmosphere it creates. A well thought out album I agree. There was of course people saying album should have ended at track 6. You can't please everyone. One member of slow is in a new band. I should check out there stuff out. 

Igorr is very interesting music. I don't get it yet. It's certainly more eclectic than the stuff I'm used to. It ebbs and flows from what I've heard. Slow,slow bits then going very fast and bit crazy which is fun. They've been featured in metal hammer magazine a number of times so I know the name but never really listened to it. Thanks for recommending. Do you prefer early or later albums. 

Abussic have quite easy listening sound but it's true they could be classed as underground. Et moriemur would be in same category. 

 

If trees could talk post rock is very much my kind of music. Only heard one track though. 😁 Not heard others 

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  • 1 month later...

I can't recall the exact year, 1983 perhaps? My brother had already exposed me to Iron Maiden, and I annexed a casette I found in his room, Denim and Leather with Saxon, which was the first record which got me into metal. I then got my hands on Iron Maiden's Killers and The Number of the Beast, and the rest is, as they say, history, it's impossible to replicate the impact of those two Iron Maiden records

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Iron Maiden never had that big of an impact on me like I hear so many other people say. For me the biggest impact bands in the very early 80'e were Motorhead, Scorpions, Priest and Saxon. Later came Metallica, Slayer, Celtic Frost, Fate, Candlenass, Overkill. Maiden was way down the list. But I suppose it all depends which bands each person might've heard first. I'm a little older than you so I probably had a chance to hear some of these bands before you did. People born after 1970 were able to discover most of these early/mid 80's bands all together at once in their teens while us older guys had to wait and we got each one in order as they came along and released their albums. So the metal bands we heard first had a bigger impact on us. 

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8 hours ago, GoatmasterGeneral said:

Iron Maiden never had that big of an impact on me like I hear so many other people say. For me the biggest impact bands in the very early 80'e were Motorhead, Scorpions, Priest and Saxon. Later came Metallica, Slayer, Celtic Frost, Fate, Candlenass, Overkill. Maiden was way down the list. But I suppose it all depends which bands each person might've heard first. I'm a little older than you so I probably had a chance to hear some of these bands before you did. People born after 1970 were able to discover most of these early/mid 80's bands all together at once in their teens while us older guys had to wait and we got each one in order as they came along and released their albums. So the metal bands we heard first had a bigger impact on us. 

That's a great point.  I'm a casual Iron Maiden fan, but I've never quite understood the deep obsession with them that seems to run through a vast expanse of the metal community.  I suppose it's like you stated - that it really depends on which bands people heard first and really connected with.  I love a lot of the early Maiden albums, like "Number of the Beast", "Piece of Mind", "Powerslave", "Somewhere in Time", etc.  I was born in 1990, so I have the pleasure now of looking back and recognizing that I was just being born when my favorite band of all time was beginning to rise to prominence (PanterA).  Judas Priest is the band that I love the most from those early years of metal, long before I was born.  They're in my top 5 favorite bands.  Haven't listened to much else for the past couple of weeks actually.  I'm really going to make an effort to get into Saxon in the near future.  I've heard some of their stuff but never really took a dive into their material.  Looking forward to it!

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For me, when I got my grubby little fingers on my cousin's vinyl collection I found that the Iron Maiden albums in there spoke to me better than most of the others.  From an artwork perspective they were a real standout (bear in mind the other's were UFO, Rush, Saxon and Sex Pistols) and so the music sounded more evil when I sat gazing at the album covers as they played for what seemed like the millionth time.  As a result, I literally spent hours with them over what was a limited period of time (ripped them to cassette mind - so could carry on enjoying them).  Again, going back to the fact that I had limited income (at 13 I was not the corporate behemoth I am today on the salary front) I wasn't in a position not to like everything that fell into my path and so although there were some albums that took a while to grow - like NOTB - I had the time to let them grow with me.

Maiden are probably the single most important band in my first year of metal and they actually stuck around in terms of regular rotation even as I grew my own vinyl, CD and cassette collection into more extreme genres of metal.  Saxon were the only other real staying point in my tastes over the years from that original pile of records, although I only really appreciated their brilliance on Long Arm of the Law which remains their magnum opus for me.  I did buy a CD copy of Power & Glory which was the album in the vinyl hoard I borrowed but beyond nostalgia there isn't a lot there for me.  I hated Sex Pistols from day one of hearing them and was far too young and dumb to appreciate Rush until I was older.  UFO have remained on the fringes of my listening ever since Strangers... in all honesty, after a brief foray into their discography a decade or so ago I found very little that I had been missing.

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Man, I tried so hard to get into Rush back in the 70's. Believe it or not they were presented to us in the beginning by the 70's rock press as the Canadian Zeppelin. So being a huge Zeppelin fan as a teenager with limited funds I bought 3 or 4 of their early records figuring they'd be sure things.

Problem was they're not the Canadian Zeppelin at all, they're insufferable nerd/prog rock with insufferably high vocals. I hate Rush. Why I bought two more Rush albums after not liking the first 2 I'll never know. Maybe By-Tor the snow dog knows. I guess they just kept getting praised so much across the board in the press that my teenage self wanted to buy into the hype. We didn't have the luxury of hearing shit first back then. Bought lots of stuff I didn't like in the 70's and 80's off of strong positive rock magazine reviews that made bands and their records sound like they were gonna be so much better than they actually were.

I look at Iron Maiden in much the same way as I would any ex-girlfriend from my early 20's. She caught my eye one day, we met and seemed to hit it off pretty well, I became mildly infatuated, we had a brief but torrid love affair, banged her as often as I could, but then before long she became shrew-like and annoying. So being young and carefree we just kinda started drifting apart, then I found some other new bands that I liked a lot better so by '85 we had broken up and gone our separate ways.

Turned out to be a good move as she went on to be the town whore and seems like pretty much everyone's had their turn with her. I'm not one of those guys who likes to stay friends with his exes, and I rarely think of her anymore these last 37 years. Haven't even bothered listening to any of her albums since Powerslave. 

Saxon is great and I still listen to them sometimes, but really just that 4 album stretch: Strong Arm, Wheels of Steel, D&L and TheP&theG.

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Funny, I wasn't a massive Maiden fan, but have a soft spot for Piece of Mind and Power Slave. Sure, I like number of the Beast and Killers but not as much. Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner gets me every time. Love that fucking song.

First metal. Hmmm? First hard rock would have to be KISS, Love Gun album in particular and Aerosmith Draw the Line prolly followed by Van Halen. But it was AC/DC's Bon Scott albums that really struck gold with me. I listened to almost nothing but AC/DC in the snot nosed middle school years. 

My first metal album was Judas Priest/Sin After Sin for some odd reason-prolly just liked the look of the album. Shortly after that, I remember buying a cassette of Unleashed in the East and the album British Steel-not sure which one would have been first, then maybe Piece of Mind...at some point hair bands albums like Shout at the Devil, Stay Hungry, Slide it In  and Out of  the Cellar would have been in heavy rotation.

But it was always Priest for me as my initial love for metal (British Steel, Screaming and Defenders) ....OK a little Deaf Leppard too-High 'N' Dry -the only album of theirs I ever kinned. to. All of this would have been in early high school-79-84. I also had Hell Bent for Leather but never loved that one as much.  

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12 hours ago, GoatmasterGeneral said:

 us older guys had to wait and we got each one in order as they came along and released their albums. So the metal bands we heard first had a bigger impact on us

Exactly, though I would claim that you can't underplay how important Iron Maiden was for the evolution of metal. I don't really listen to them much these days, and anything after Powerslave is of little interest to me. Anyway, I would say Killers and The Number of the Beast are two of the best metal records from that period

Growing up in Norway, we had one government run TV channel and two government run radio channels which rarely played anything heavier than the Rolling Stones, commercial TV and radio didn't appear until well into the 80's, so we relied heavily on what friends and acquaintances had, trading tapes and such. There are bands I never even heard of until much later. Riot for example, judging from what I've heard from the period I got into metal I think would have been right up my alley at the time, I didn't even know existed until a couple of years ago. Fortunately metal fans were always eager to share, so I quickly got a taste of bands like Judas Priest, Accept, Dio, Scorpions, and even Y&T, to name a few

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Rush isn't for everyone, but they sure are a favorite of mine. I taped my first copy of Moving Pictures with a boom box in front of one of the living room speakers when I was 10 or 11 - 1990ish - and it's been one of my favorite albums ever since. This was also the time when I was getting into Metallica, GnR, Queensryche, and a bunch of other mainstream metal and rock. My taste went all over the map from there. Most of what I started off enjoying only gets dusted off every few years for nostalgia's sake. But my appreciation and enjoyment of Rush has only gotten stronger with time, no nostalgia there. I do feel that connection with my childhood self when I put them on, but the music is still alive and relevant for me in a way the other bands usually aren't.

Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath, Zep, and to a lesser extent JP were always bands other people liked, that I could more or less tolerate if I was hanging out with friends or at a party or something. I tried listening to Maiden and Sabbath on my own a bunch of times, eventually gave up on Maiden, only started truly enjoying Sabbath in the past 10-15 years or so. 

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1 hour ago, GoatmasterGeneral said:

Man, I tried so hard to get into Rush back in the 70's. Believe it or not they were presented to us in the beginning by the 70's rock press as the Canadian Zeppelin. So being a huge Zeppelin fan as a teenager with limited funds I bought 3 or 4 of their early records figuring they'd be sure things.

Problem was they're not the Canadian Zeppelin at all, they're insufferable nerd/prog rock with insufferably high vocals. I hate Rush. Why I bought two more Rush albums after not liking the first 2 I'll never know. Maybe By-Tor the snow dog knows. I guess they just kept getting praised so much across the board in the press that my teenage self wanted to buy into the hype. We didn't have the luxury of hearing shit first back then. Bought lots of stuff I didn't like in the 70's and 80's off of strong positive rock magazine reviews that made bands and their records sound like they were gonna be so much better than they actually were.

I look at Iron Maiden in much the same way as I would any ex-girlfriend from my early 20's. She caught my eye one day, we met and seemed to hit it off pretty well, I became mildly infatuated, we had a brief but torrid love affair, banged her as often as I could, but then before long she became shrew-like and annoying. So being young and carefree we just kinda started drifting apart, then I found some other new bands that I liked a lot better so by '85 we had broken up and gone our separate ways.

Turned out to be a good move as she went on to be the town whore and seems like pretty much everyone's had their turn with her. I'm not one of those guys who likes to stay friends with his exes, and I rarely think of her anymore these last 37 years. Haven't even bothered listening to any of her albums since Powerslave. 

Saxon is great and I still listen to them sometimes, but really just that 4 album stretch: Strong Arm, Wheels of Steel, D&L and TheP&theG.

That's a great analogy concerning Iron Maiden!  Totally agree.  I've found most of their modern stuff very difficult to get into, with the extremely bloated songs that are repetitive and boring.  There are certain individual tracks that I like every now and then, but I largely have no desire to listen to them these days.  Regarding Saxon, I'm thoroughly enjoying "Wheels of Steel" so far.  Great stuff.

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3 hours ago, markm said:

Funny, I wasn't a massive Maiden fan, but have a soft spot for Piece of Mind and Power Slave. Sure, I like number of the Beast and Killers but not as much. Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner gets me every time. Love that fucking song.

First metal. Hmmm? First hard rock would have to be KISS, Love Gun album in particular and Aerosmith Draw the Line prolly followed by Van Halen. But it was AC/DC's Bon Scott albums that really struck gold with me. I listened to almost nothing but AC/DC in the snot nosed middle school years. 

My first metal album was Judas Priest/Sin After Sin for some odd reason-prolly just liked the look of the album. Shortly after that, I remember buying a cassette of Unleashed in the East and the album British Steel-not sure which one would have been first, then maybe Piece of Mind...at some point hair bands albums like Shout at the Devil, Stay Hungry, Slide it In and Out  of the Cellar would have been in heavy rotation.

But it was always Priest for me as my initial love for metal (British Steel, Screaming and Defenders) ....OK a little Deaf Leppard too-High 'N' Dry -the only album of theirs I ever kinned. to. All of this would have been in early high school-79-84. I also had Hell Bent for Leather but never loved that one as much.  

Slide it In and Out? Not sure I remember that one, but it sounds like something I might enjoy 😉

I know we've been over this multiple times before Marky Mark, but I just can't get over how different our typical high school playlists were even just being 4 or 5 years apart. There was no metal yet when I was in high school, only hard rock. I had records by Zeppelin, Sabbath, Aerosmith, AC/DC, Ramones, ZZTop, Skynyrd, Lizzy, Nugent, Floyd, Kiss, Queen, the first 2 Van Halen albums dropped in my junior and senior years, but I didn't discover any of those other pioneering metal bands you listed or actually most of them didn't even exist yet until after I'd already graduated in June of '79. And believe me there was absolutely nothing even resembling anything 'hard' on NY rock radio back in the 70's, even late at night, it was soft cock all the way. And this was many years before Headbangers Ball or anything like that so new bands were really hard to find.

I found Unleashed in the East later in '79 after I'd graduated, that was my intro to Priest, I bought it after hearing various cover bands playing their songs in the local clubs. Tried going back into their discography after that but their 70's stuff just never clicked with me at all except for some of Hellbent. Really not a fan of Halford, I liked those 80's Priest records in spite of him for the crunchy twin guitar attack.

Some University of South Carolina dorm buddies up there on the 3rd floor with their black light posters, 70's porn 'stashes and perfectly rolled joints introduced me to the Scorpions in '79/'80 who became one of favorite bands for a couple of years there, their 70's stuff was fantastic. 

Motorhead I found in '81 by way of a write-up for their No Sleep Til Hammersmith live album in a rock magazine, would've been either Circus or Cream because those were the 2 back then. I quickly grabbed copies of Hammersmith and then Ace, Ovekill and Bomber, they almost immediately became my #1 favorite band. Motorhead had a much bigger impact on me personally than Priest or Maiden or really any other band from that era besides Sabbath of course,  who will always be my 70's and early 80's heavy metal heroes.

Maiden I found a little later on as well, actually heard Run to the Hills come on the radio while driving to the beer store one afternoon and made a mental note, must have been early '82 I would have been 20. Killers then turned out to be my favorite of theirs by far, I'm not a Dickenson fan at all.

Don't remember exactly how I found Saxon, a blind grab in the record store probably. Not even sure which of their albums I heard first, I'm gonna guess it was probably Denim & Leather in 1981. They made a big impression on me too, I liked them far more than either Priest or Maiden or any of the other subsequent nwobhm bands and I still do.

My 70's suburban Long Island high school had been pretty well split down the middle with the disco kids on one side and the hippie dead heads and Who fans on the other. I hated both of those things as a budding hardcore metalhead so I was basically on my own as a teen musically speaking to discover whatever I could by any means necessary with my small group of friends in tow. Can't hardly imagine what it must have been like to go to a school when heavy metal was already in full swing and other kids were into it as well. Musta been cool.

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53 minutes ago, GoatmasterGeneral said:

Slide it In and Out? Not sure I remember that one, but it sounds like something I might enjoy 😉

I know we've been over this multiple times before Marky Mark, but I just can't get over how different our typical high school playlists were even just being 4 or 5 years apart. There was no metal yet when I was in high school, only hard rock. I had records by Zeppelin, Sabbath, Aerosmith, AC/DC, Ramones, ZZTop, Skynyrd, Lizzy, Nugent, Floyd, Kiss, Queen, the first 2 Van Halen albums dropped in my junior and senior years, but I didn't discover any of those other pioneering metal bands you listed or actually most of them didn't even exist yet until after I'd already graduated in June of '79. And believe me there was absolutely nothing even resembling anything 'hard' on NY rock radio back in the 70's, even late at night, it was soft cock all the way. And this was many years before Headbangers Ball or anything like that so new bands were really hard to find.

I found Unleashed in the East later in '79 after I'd graduated, that was my intro to Priest, I bought it after hearing various cover bands playing their songs in the local clubs. Tried going back into their discography after that but their 70's stuff just never clicked with me at all except for some of Hellbent. Really not a fan of Halford, I liked those 80's Priest records in spite of him for the crunchy twin guitar attack.

Some University of South Carolina dorm buddies up there on the 3rd floor with their black light posters, 70's porn 'stashes and perfectly rolled joints introduced me to the Scorpions in '79/'80 who became one of favorite bands for a couple of years there, their 70's stuff was fantastic. 

Motorhead I found in '81 by way of a write-up for their No Sleep Til Hammersmith live album in a rock magazine, would've been either Circus or Cream because those were the 2 back then. I quickly grabbed copies of Hammersmith and then Ace, Ovekill and Bomber, they almost immediately became my #1 favorite band. Motorhead had a much bigger impact on me personally than Priest or Maiden or really any other band from that era besides Sabbath of course,  who will always be my 70's and early 80's heavy metal heroes.

Maiden I found a little later on as well, actually heard Run to the Hills come on the radio while driving to the beer store one afternoon and made a mental note, must have been early '82 I would have been 20. Killers then turned out to be my favorite of theirs by far, I'm not a Dickenson fan at all.

Don't remember exactly how I found Saxon, a blind grab in the record store probably. Not even sure which of their albums I heard first, I'm gonna guess it was probably Denim & Leather in 1981. They made a big impression on me too, I liked them far more than either Priest or Maiden or any of the other subsequent nwobhm bands and I still do.

My 70's suburban Long Island high school had been pretty well split down the middle with the disco kids on one side and the hippie dead heads and Who fans on the other. I hated both of those things as a budding hardcore metalhead so I was basically on my own as a teen musically speaking to discover whatever I could by any means necessary with my small group of friends in tow. Can't hardly imagine what it must have been like to go to a school when heavy metal was already in full swing and other kids were into it as well. Musta been cool.

Slide It In - Wikipedia

About as commercial radio friendly as you can get -I know you know this one,  Noise-Love Ain't No Stranger, Slow and Easy....

Yeah, i don't think I've ever listened to Saxon other than in passing. I wish I had picked up more earlier Scorpions. I had a comp of their earlier stuff. Had to look it up just now. Best of The Scorpions Vol. 2 I found somewhere on vinyl, came out in '84. Never found vol. 1.  You probably had the actual albums. I did own Blackout-loved that album.

Vol 2 
1    Top of the Bill

2    They Need a Million

3    Longing for Fire
  
4    Catch Your Train

5    Speedy's Coming

6    Crying Days

7    All Night Long
 
8    This Is My Song

9    Sun in My Hand

10    We'll Burn the Sky

 

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3 hours ago, markm said:

About as commercial radio friendly as you can get -I know you know this one,  Noise-Love Ain't No Stranger, Slow and Easy....

Yeah, I don't think I've ever listened to Saxon other than in passing. I wish I had picked up more earlier Scorpions. I had a comp of their earlier stuff. Had to look it up just now. Best of The Scorpions Vol. 2 I found somewhere on vinyl, came out in '84. Never found vol. 1.  You probably had the actual albums. I did own Blackout-loved that album.

Mark. Bubula. It was just a little joke. Very little apparently. You listed the albums Slide It In, and Out of the Cellar without a comma between them so I read it the first time as: Slide it in and Out. A dumb joke to be sure but that's all it was. Of course I am familiar with Whitesnake, I married their number one fan after all. Coverdale was her celebrity crush, with Blackie Lawless a close second. Although in her fantasies she wanted the 1980's versions of David and Blackie to ravage her not the 70 year old men they are now. I wouldn't know which specific songs were from which Whitesnake albums because I'm not a huge fan of chick pop rock generally speaking, but I wouldn't run from the room screaming if you were to play one of their songs like Deadovic when he hears midpaced black metal. But I really think the whole reason Coverdale had his own band and wrote all those sex songs was just to get himself laid after the set was over. I'm sure he told all of the chicks backstage that he had been singing them all just to her. I don't know the 'deep cuts' but I can tell you most of those radio songs have no other possible excuse to exist.

Now the Scorpions I always liked since the first time I heard them in '79, but even they were starting to get a bit chick friendly just a few years later in the mid 80's. First Sting in '84 was where they really got lame and I gave 'em up for good.

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Epicus Doomicus Metalicus was my intro into extreme metal followed closely by King Diamond, Metallica, and Slayer much to my mother's disappointment. Before that, I was in deep with hard rock and 70's bands thanks to my dad. He graduated in 72, so just a bit older than you General. Whitesnake - Slip of the Tongue was the second record I ever bought with my own money (First was Hungry Like the Wolf by Duran Duran - don't judge). I remember being big into early Ratt, Def Leppard, Bon Jovi, AC/DC of course, Twisted Sister, and Van Halen. Dad gifted me with BOC, Zeppelin, UFO, Uriah Heep, and Skynyrd among others, but after I got my first taste of real metal the only older bands I stuck with was Rush (who were still putting out good albums and as a bass player, Geddy was my idol). GnR dropped Appetite in my freshman year of high school and I wore that the fuck out. Much more attitude and aggressiveness than the Cinderellas, White Lions, Skid Rows, and Warrants that were on the radio at the time. Still love that album. Whitesnake we're fun enough, but not a band I really spent much time with. Never did Deep Purple either so Coverdale always struck me as a budget Robert Plant. John Sykes and Adrian Vandenberg we're both certifiable guitar heroes back in the day though. I can't remember the exact album that got me to sell my soul, but it was late 80's thrash from one of the big 3 (RiB, AJFA, or Peace Sells). Got my first tattoo listening to Beneath the Remains in a seedy biker tattoo studio than ran coke out of the back room (my cousin who was in the Outlaws - the Florida equivalent of the Hells Angels - hooked me up). Then thrash started to fade and Obituary hit me like a freight train. Then Morbid Angel. Like mainlining a speedball of Satan and extra Satan. As a degenerate junkie, I still can't get enough. Black metal for the most part has only been a main focus for the last 5-7 years aside from the early Norwegian stuff from the 90s. If only I'd found Bathory earlier (say in the 80s), I'm sure it would have been different. Emperor and Mayhem were great, even the first couple of Dimmu Borgir and CoF, but death reigned supreme in my rotten heart.

Maiden caught my attention with Seventh Son. The cover art was just so badass. Still one of my favorite covers of all time. I love me some Maiden, but I'd be a metalhead without them. I didn't seriously get into Priest or Scorpions until much more recently when I started going back to those bands my dad turned me on to as a kid. Maybe 10 years ago or so.

Anyway, my point is, 5 or 10 years was huge back then in music. So much changed so fast. Doesn't seem that way anymore, but it's probably just perspective talking. Also matters where you grew up. Down in bumfuck North Florida/South Alabama, there was only so much we could get our hands on. Venom was just not anywhere I remember. Celtic Frost maybe, but I don't remember hearing about them until that SOD song making fun of them. I do remember having Helloween's KotSK pt 2 which my mom again detested, but that was exotic (and badass) to me. We were totally at the mercy of what the 2 record shops in town stocked, how many yards we could mow, and what our friends had managed to acquire. Fun times.

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I got the black album by Metallica and I requested something heavier from my parents. Well think that was story. Friends of my parents gave me a kerrang best of album. It had sepultura terrortiary on it which blew my mind as never heard anything that heavy. Still very much like that song even if I listen to heavier stuff now. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I secretly starting listening to hard rock in my mid-teens, which wasn't very popular with my family or school (they were all religious). Then when I was about 17 I started liking power metal bands like Nightwish and Sonata Arctica, which I don't really like today. Then in my early 20s I went into more hardcore heavy metal, black metal and nu metal, which are still my preferred genres.

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It was in small steps, but pretty recently.
I had a boyfriend a year ago who listened to a lot of that type of music, and he would sometimes tell me that it was called "thrash" and all that, but we didn't talk about it too much.

We don't date anymore, but I started thinking about this genre more and more, since I had secretly found it interesting.
However, I didn't tell anyone about it at first, since I felt a bit awkward about being seemingly the only girl who was interested in this genre;
I guess it is a little bit like how guys might hesitate to tell people if they like boy bands, but for me it was the other way round, if you know what I mean, haha - it didn't seem "sweet" and "cutesy" enough, I guess.
I have however learned that metal music is more popular among girls than I used to think, and this forum is one more stepping stone for me to get more and more familiar with it. ^-^

I have noticed that guys are generally surprised in a positive way when I tell them that I like this genre;
their reactions are usually like "wow, you are a fan of that?" with a smile, and start asking me how I like it with great interest, and that is very sweet of them.

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It’s a niche genre no doubt. If they’re longer term fans knowing it’s thrash not just lumping all the bands under the metal category could also get their attention.

 

As for myself it was 2002 and young Oblibion knew nothing of music that wasn’t played on the radio or in his favourite video games, so naive. One day his cousin showed him Cemetary Gates, and after picking his jaw from the floor he was hooked. Twenty years later metal and it’s many sub genres continue to amaze me and take me back to being at 12 year old kid hearing distorted guitars for the first time.

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  • 4 months later...

for me my love for metal began at a def leppard concert i was took to at 11, but before then my dad used to put a bit of rob zombies hellbilly deluxe on in the car. at just about 6 years old i think, i snuck upstairs with the CD to listen to the final track, house of a thousand corpses, which scared the fucking shit out of me, but i thought it was awesome 

after the def leppard concert i bought an iron maiden CD with my pocket money, somewhere back in time, which really concreted my intrest in metal overall. i would do all the usual stuff youd expect, that weve all done: read the little booklet and stared at the art and listen to the entire album over 100 times, literally, and the whole "thankyou for buying this album, we hope it can provide the best for this next generation of iron maiden fans" (or something like that) text in the booklet was really inclusive. i felt like a metalhead

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