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I'm a fan mostly of 70's punk like a lot of the bands mentioned previously. Just went to see the Dead Boys a few months ago playing Young Loud and Snotty. It was a great show! No Stiv obviously but Cheetah Chrome and Johnny Blitz can still rock.

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5 hours ago, morbidspectre said:

Ever heard of Siekiera?

 

Yeh...not much though..must check em out more..this is great cheers!

2 hours ago, Beor said:

I'm a fan mostly of 70's punk like a lot of the bands mentioned previously. Just went to see the Dead Boys a few months ago playing Young Loud and Snotty. It was a great show! No Stiv obviously but Cheetah Chrome and Johnny Blitz can still rock.

I love 'All This and More' would've been awesome to see em with Stiv sucked what happened to him. 

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"Punk rock" died in 1978 as far as I'm concerned. It was a movement which was about a lot more than just the music. Culturally speaking it was the end of Clement Atlee's "Ingsoc" era, harbinger of the Thacher years, and very very very native to the UK (where that sort of thing was quite common, the catalogue of youth subcultures like skins, teds, mods and whatnot, were followed by punks). That being said, it leaves the problem of what to call that sort of thing, i.e. hard, fast, aggressive rock, often with a heavy political leaning. For instance, at the time, everybody knew about the Ramones (and many were inspired by them) but nobody considered them to be "punk rock" proper. The name punk has stuck though ... and I guess that's allright, even though it's kind of misguided. Much of what's considered punk is just good old party music ... such as ... WTF are you supposed to call bands like The Carburetors?

This is where the punk label meets the wall. 

But who am I to be such a fucking snob? Once upon a time in Norway, the genre thing was mocked by the band Turbonegro, who labelled themselves "deathpunk" and definitely delivered the goods ... but they shunned the punk label for precisely the reasons mentioned:

Then there was the hardcore boys. There can be little doubt that the 90s scene grew out of the 80s scene ... but the overall music scene in Norway is so small that everybody knows everybody else, at least at the rock end of the spectrum ... which is why the groundwork laid down by bands such as So Much Hate was really important to understand the context from which Norwegian rock (in general) entered the world stage.

 

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"Punk rock" died in 1978 as far as I'm concerned. It was a movement which was about a lot more than just the music. Culturally speaking it was the end of Clement Atlee's "Ingsoc" era, harbinger of the Thacher years, and very very very native to the UK (where that sort of thing was quite common, the catalogue of youth subcultures like skins, teds, mods and whatnot, were followed by punks). That being said, it leaves the problem of what to call that sort of thing, i.e. hard, fast, aggressive rock, often with a heavy political leaning. For instance, at the time, everybody knew about the Ramones (and many were inspired by them) but nobody considered them to be "punk rock" proper. The name punk has stuck though ... and I guess that's allright, even though it's kind of misguided. Much of what's considered punk is just good old party music ... such as ... WTF are you supposed to call bands like The Carburetors?
[/url] This is where the punk label meets the wall. 
But who am I to be such a fucking snob? Once upon a time in Norway, the genre thing was mocked by the band Turbonegro, who labelled themselves "deathpunk" and definitely delivered the goods ... but they shunned the punk label for precisely the reasons mentioned:
Then there was the hardcore boys. There can be little doubt that the 90s scene grew out of the 80s scene ... but the overall music scene in Norway is so small that everybody knows everybody else, at least at the rock end of the spectrum ... which is why the groundwork laid down by bands such as So Much Hate was really important to understand the context from which Norwegian rock (in general) entered the world stage.
 
Even with songs like "Judy is a Punk" and "Sheena is a Punk Rocker", nobody considered them punk rock? Seems unlikely. I'm not the most knowledgeable about punk, but I know that Ramones wasn't the only band stateside that was making punk rock waves.

Sent from my HTCD160LVW using Tapatalk

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So I guess Im posting on an old thread ( do you guys string newbs up for this offense?) ,but I love Punk and Oi!  Because the Oi scene has been losing its momentum Ive gravitated back towards the metal stuff.  For a heavier sound check out Concrete Elite from Texas--- incredible band!  Also, if any if any of you are into that jangly guitar 60s Brit guitar sound with solid vocals --- listen to the Templars from New York.

Hard as nails Power Violence--- listen to my buddy's band from S.F.called Aninoko--- the vocals are all in Tagalog and really pissed off!  I highly recommend.

And,lastly if you like irreverent and offensive in the vein of the Mentors--- check out A Killing Tradition -- the track called " Charlie Loves You" is harder than shit!

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I discovered and was a fan of punk rock before I gravitated toward metal. I like a lot of the old bands from the 70s but also some of the American hardcore/revival shit that was around in the 80s and early/mid-90s. I still listen to it sometimes but my taste in music grew so much heavier in my late teens/early 20s and stayed that way. Favorite band? Probably have to go with the Clash on this one, but it's impossible for me to pick a favorite song. 

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I've been into Punk about as long as I've been digging metal. I guess I like metal more, but the Misfits is one of my favorite bands, and the only band I have a tattoo of.  Also like Ramones, Black Flag, Discharge, G.B.H., Minor Threat, Cock Sparer, Bad Brains, Alkaline Trio, Crude SS, Black Uniforms, and many more that I can't think of right now. Have always loved all the different ways punk and metal mix and influence each other. I love black metal with strong punk influence like Hellhammer. 

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