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10 hours ago, GorboGorboze said:

I've been listening to lot of jazz recently, Ella Fitzgerald is my favorite, and I have been learning Autumn Leaves and Gee Baby Ain't I Good To You on the bass. I also listen to lots of old soul.

Autumn Leaves is a good song. I'll check out Gee Baby Ain't I Good To You when I get a chance. 

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3 hours ago, Parker said:

I like early hot jazz and fusion jazz, especially the song "right off" by Miles Davis. Smooth jazz is some of the worst music I've ever heard. 

To me, Smooth Jazz doesn't sound like jazz. It sounds more like funk. Miles Davis was a great trumpet player. I listen to the Kind of Blue album sometimes. It's very relaxing. Right Off is one of the first jazz songs I've ever heard with a wah-wah effect.

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2 hours ago, MacabreEternal said:

I have Miles Davis "Kind Of Blue", Thelonious Monk "Monk's Dream" and Ornette Coleman "The Shape Of Jazz To Come".  I flirt around with bits of the genre now and again but never really have managed to get to the level of exploration level I would like to.

Monk's Dream is a good album. I like the piano intros on Monk's Dream and Bright Mississippi. I also like the tenor sax intro on See-Ya.

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  • 1 year later...
On 4/9/2017 at 6:25 PM, Amebix said:

I've been getting really into bebop. Some favorites:

Charles Mingus - Let My Children Hear Music, Blues & Roots

Wayne Shorter - Juju, Speak No Evil

Pete La Roca - Basra

Lee Morgan - The Sidewinder

Art Blakey - Moanin'

 

 

I haven’t gotten around to listening to the other bebop albums yet, but Blues & Roots is a great album. It’s something how Wednesday Night Prayer Meeting sounded so wild and upbeat. I guess everyone at the meeting got off track and started telling funny stories or something.

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  • 3 years later...
25 minutes ago, Thatguy said:

OK.  So here is a jazz thread -  pretty underdeveloped. I think I will stick to 'what I am listening to now' for the moment and maybe come back to this when I have the time and inclination to build Thatguy's guide to jazz.

Feel free to start your own if you're so inclined. I know I'd be interested. I've gotten into some of the greatest hits through friends and YouTube, but I'd love some further listening recommendations.

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I'm pretty standard -50's-70's classic jazz-lots of Coltrane, Miles and their sidemen, Chick Chorea, Herbie,  Art Blakey, Joe Henderson, Ornette Coleman etc. The big ones everyone likes. In recent history I like Pat Metheny and Brad Mehdlau. I don't go a whole lot deeper than that. I could easily listen to Miles and Coltrane for the rest of my life as far as Jazz goes and call it a day.

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39 minutes ago, markm said:

I'm pretty standard -50's-70's classic jazz-lots of Coltrane, Miles and their sidemen, Chick Chorea, Herbie,  Art Blakey, Joe Henderson, Ornette Coleman etc. The big ones everyone likes. In recent history I like Pat Metheny and Brad Mehdlau. I don't go a whole lot deeper than that. I could easily listen to Miles and Coltrane for the rest of my life as far as Jazz goes and call it a day.

Not much better than Miles and Coltrane. Throw in a little Bill Evans and call it a day 

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So...do I love Miles? Of course, but there is a lot of Miles that I have heard so often that it is background music to me. My lifetime Miles album? GET UP WITH IT.

Do I love Coltrane? Of course, I am a saxophone player. What Coltrane do I still listen to? ASCENSION and LIVE IN JAPAN. Heavy metal jazz.

Do I love Ornette? Of course, I started on alto sax. My lifetime Ornette album? SCIENCE FICTION.

Fast forward to the 21st century and I will drop a name and a few album titles when I have a moment.

First one - MAKAYA MCCRAVEN - In the Moment. I think I listed this album or another by him in 'what I am listening to now' and said that this was so hip that the unworthy would not be allowed to listen to it. I wrote that because I am an arsehole, but this is jazz now -  modern beats, really cool stuff and anyone interested in where jazz beyond the classics is at should give this a go.

 

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7 hours ago, navybsn said:

Not much better than Miles and Coltrane. Throw in a little Bill Evans and call it a day 

I knew I'd forget some important ones-Bill Evans is essential. Some of the sideman guys I'd also throw in would be Wayne Shorter, Freddie Hubbard, Kenny Dorham and the amazing pianist McCoy Tyner-anything that dude played on was like dipping jazz in the nectar of the Gods. I like some of Marsalis' retro classic jazz sounds especially his mammoth live at the Village Vanguard set where he has disc for each day of the week he played there edited over several years. I can do Diana Krall. Of course, Monk, Armstrong once you get over the archaic recording quality, Mahavishnu, Rollins and  Duke Ellington, Clifford Brown....the whose who list pretty much. 

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10 hours ago, Thatguy said:

So...do I love Miles? Of course, but there is a lot of Miles that I have heard so often that it is background music to me. My lifetime Miles album? GET UP WITH IT.

Do I love Coltrane? Of course, I am a saxophone player. What Coltrane do I still listen to? ASCENSION and LIVE IN JAPAN. Heavy metal jazz.

Do I love Ornette? Of course, I started on alto sax. My lifetime Ornette album? SCIENCE FICTION.

Fast forward to the 21st century and I will drop a name and a few album titles when I have a moment.

First one - MAKAYA MCCRAVEN - In the Moment. I think I listed this album or another by him in 'what I am listening to now' and said that this was so hip that the unworthy would not be allowed to listen to it. I wrote that because I am an arsehole, but this is jazz now -  modern beats, really cool stuff that anyone interested in where jazz beyond the classics is at should give this a go.

 

Ended up buying this after spinning it a couple of times today. Good rec.

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12 hours ago, navybsn said:

I'll give it a try today. A more modern artist I like is Yaz Ahmed. This album made my top 10 in 2017.

La Saboteuse

 

This is good.  I will give it a good listen later.  If you haven't already, you should check out ANOUAR BRAHEM.  Arabic scales and rhythms with a mixture of Western and traditional instrumentation. Still jazz.

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I'll play even though I'm basic. Two of my favorite go-to albums over the past few years. Something old - Ethiopiques Vol. 4 (Mulatu Astatqé). I can't get enough of the atmosphere on these recordings.

 

Something new - a song from Tigran Hamasyan's album "Mockroot". First heard some of his stuff on NPR years ago. I think I'm going to take this album with me to my grave. 

 

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So much music, so little time.  It is my birthday today and I am not at work so time to check these out.

The first track on the Ethiopiques is essentially Chick Corea's Spain isn't it?  Whatever, cool atmosphere I agree.

And why have I never heard of Tigran Hamasyan? This one goes straight into my Wishlist.

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Next...

TOMASZ STANKO.  Polish trumpet player of stunning lyricism.  Probably more than Miles the sound of Stanko's trumpet - not annoyingly brassy, not self consciously breathy but simply the sound of his musical thought - has made me love an instrument that used to kind of annoy me.  Let me tell you that trumpet players - like lead guitarists  -  usually have volume issues and the last time I played in a band with trumpets I swore would really be my last...

Like most jazz players, Stanko has released lots of albums with different types of ensembles.  If you want gorgeous lyricism in a jazz quartet led by trumpet -  start with Suspended Night.

My favourite of what I have heard though is Litania - Music of Krzysztof Komeda.  This album puts me in mental state I call a jazz dream.  Great compositions and great playing by a septet- trumpet, two tenor saxophones and Terje Rypdal's unmistakable guitar on some tracks and an amazing rhythm section.  The tunes were composed as film sound tracks and maybe that is partly why they are so atmospheric.  Stanko solos as beautifully as ever, but I am especially impressed by the sax players.  They avoid empty virtuosity and play compositional solos that I can listen to again and again.

Get it into you.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Another trumpet player next, although he mainly recorded on flugelhorn, KENNY WHEELER. It's hard to know where to start with the recorded legacy of this jazz giant who died in 2014 at the age of 84. Check out his Wikipedia page to get an idea of his legacy. He was a leader, a collaborator and a session player.  He was a significant composer and innovator. He had an unmistakable sound on flugelhorn and was a fluent improvisor who fitted in to every musical space -  from the jazz avant-guarde to the mainstream to embellishing the albums of non-jazz artists such as David Sylvian and Joni Mitchell. He just made everything better.

My favourites?  With Anthony Braxton - New York ,Fall 1974 and Five Pieces 1975. Some of his recordings on ECM - Gnu High, Deer Wan, Angel Song, Songs for Quintet. And the David Sylvian albums Brilliant Trees, Alchemy, Gone to Earth, Dead Bees On A Cake.

There is so much of his work that I haven't yet heard.  I am looking forward to hearing more.

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