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Requiem

Gothic Rock

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On 3/4/2018 at 10:45 PM, Tortuga said:

I wonder how many here have heard of Kukl?

This was the first goth/post punk band that I ever saw live and they have been one of my favorites ever since. But all most everytime I mention them, I just get a blank stare.

And yes, the front woman is exactly who you think it is...a young Björk.

 

I can definitely see how people would really enjoy this, but this isn't really my cup of tea. I don't really understand how a term like gothic became mixed up with this sort of music. It's certainly an interesting historical document, young Bjork there! 

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4 hours ago, Requiem said:

I can definitely see how people would really enjoy this, but this isn't really my cup of tea. I don't really understand how a term like gothic became mixed up with this sort of music. It's certainly an interesting historical document, young Bjork there! 

Well, they called themselves a goth band, but were called a punk band by the Icelandic media at the time (1984). And in Copenhagen many goths regarded them as a goth band, too. I also think that at least in Scandinavia in the early to mid 1980's, nobody could really set in stone what goth what/is and that really went into the 2000's: I remember reading posts on Danish underground forums where people were still discussing what goth was.

I would call Kukl for early experimental goth because that is definitely the impression that I got when seeing them live. 

 

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Well, they called themselves a goth band, but were called a punk band by the Icelandic media at the time (1984). And in Copenhagen many goths regarded them as a goth band, too. I also think that at least in Scandinavia in the early to mid 1980's, nobody could really set in stone what goth what/is and that really went into the 2000's: I remember reading posts on Danish underground forums where people were still discussing what goth was.
I would call Kukl for early experimental goth because that is definitely the impression that I got when seeing them live. 
 
A lot of Goth sprouted up from post punk, so there is a punk connection and a bit of a grey area with the early bands. It makes sense in a lot of ways.

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37 minutes ago, BlutAusNerd said:

A lot of Goth sprouted up from post punk, so there is a punk connection and a bit of a grey area with the early bands. It makes sense in a lot of ways.

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Not to mention that people were describing darker rock as "gothic" as far back as The Doors. But yeah, the original "goth rock" as such was basically dark punk and post-punk.

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24 minutes ago, MetalheadFromBama said:

I’m starting to really like Bauhaus and The Sisters Of Mercy, but I also like some of the more glam-sounding gothic rock bands, such as Specimen and Visage. My favorite gothic rock band is The Doors, who were the founders of gothic rock.

The Sisters are great. I'm a fan of pretty much everything they did, but I have a soft spot for "First, Last, and Always" and some of the older and more primitive stuff like "Alice". Some Bauhaus is awesome too, although I find them a little hit and miss. Have you checked out Fields Of The Nephilim? As far as The Doors go, they definitely had an influence, but the sound of the genre as we know it didn't develop until the late seventies.

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23 minutes ago, FatherAlabaster said:

The Sisters are great. I'm a fan of pretty much everything they did, but I have a soft spot for "First, Last, and Always" and some of the older and more primitive stuff like "Alice". Some Bauhaus is awesome too, although I find them a little hit and miss. Have you checked out Fields Of The Nephilim? As far as The Doors go, they definitely had an influence, but the sound of the genre as we know it didn't develop until the late seventies.

I’ve never listened to Fields Of The Nephilim, but I will check them out. Thanks for the suggestion.

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The Sisters are great. I'm a fan of pretty much everything they did, but I have a soft spot for "First, Last, and Always" and some of the older and more primitive stuff like "Alice". Some Bauhaus is awesome too, although I find them a little hit and miss. Have you checked out Fields Of The Nephilim? As far as The Doors go, they definitely had an influence, but the sound of the genre as we know it didn't develop until the late seventies.
Yeah, The Doors had more of a psychedelic thing going on. It's kind of like the difference between the proto-punk of MC5 and The Who versus The Ramones, or in metal terms, the difference between Steppenwolf and Black Sabbath.

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I listen to Death rock and Gothic Rock.

From the 70s, I like Ballad of Dwight Fry by Alice Cooper. Other bands that fall under death rock are Burning Image, The Flesh Eaters, Kommunity FX, and 45 Grave.

 

I also like the progressive death rock band Theatre of Ice. 

 

Among the second wave of Gothic Rock, I like Sisters of Mercy and Alien Sex Fiend.

Modern Goth bands I like are Gothministers, Flowing Tears, and Love Like Blood.

 

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On 3/12/2018 at 12:56 PM, MetalheadFromBama said:

I’m starting to really like Bauhaus and The Sisters Of Mercy, but I also like some of the more glam-sounding gothic rock bands, such as Specimen and Visage. My favorite gothic rock band is The Doors, who were the founders of gothic rock.

Before Pete Burns was spinning people 'round he played in a Doorsy proto-goth band that released a couple of great songs, like this one:

 

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