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jtb_brah

Just had my Metal Breakthrough. What was Yours?

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Slipknot was my gateway band. I was die hard for them and then I discovered bands like Hatebreed and Lamb of God. After that I moved to Nile and other bands like that. Anything metal I can listen to now a days. HORNS UP!

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I think I was twelve, the last grade of primary school. I had a crush on someone much older and he started sending me music from Cradle of Filth and Dimmu Borgir. I hated it, but I really wanted to impress him so I listened to it 24/7 and pretended to like it. From there I found bands I actually liked. I think one of the first albums was Sirenia or maybe Tristania. I often listened to bands like My Dying Bride and Opeth too, but now I only listen to them when I feel gloomy. I try to keep to the "happier" bands now, although that must be a terrible thing to say on a metal forum :D 

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To each their own. The cool thing about metal is there's so much variety it allows for radical differences in tastes. You go more for bands like Tristania and Nightwish (IIRC), I tend to favour bands like Mournful Congregation and Ahab, H34VYM3T4LD4V3 (who you've not yet met) prefers Motorhead and Judas Priest.

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Back in 1998 I was 15/16 and into Britpop (Oasis, Blur), Nirvana, The Offspring etc. Then I picked up Total Guitar magazine and they had a track on the cover-mount CD by a British rap-metal band called One Minute Silence. That was it. I had literally heard nothing like it before, massive funky bass, razor sharp guitars and killer drums topped off by the vocalist's trademark Irish brogue spitting out these extremely politicised lyrics (OMS were likened to a British RATM for those of you who haven't heard of them), I was instantly hooked.

 

From there it was a continuation into the popular nu-metal of the day, Fear Factory, Korn, System of a Down, Deftones, then heavier stuff; Will Haven, Iron Monkey, Raging Speedhorn, then Decapitated, Mayhem and At the Gates. My journey has been a continuing evolution alongside metal, post-metal, more sludge, a shed-load of grind, a brief and mostly regrettable dalliance with deathcore and a huge, huge appreciation for mathcore/early metalcore bands like Converge, Botch, Coalesce and Cave-In.

 

I will listen to anything with a bit of edge, a bit of bite. I loathe boring, anodyne music of any genre, but One Minute Silence's "Stuck Between a Rock and a White Face" kickstarted me into the world of metal and for that I will always be grateful.

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It's interesting that my first footsteps down the extreme metal path were followed by a hasty retreat (mostly because my gf at the time was scared shitless by bands like Cradle Of Filth, Dimmu Borgir, and Cannibal Corpse). I stayed away for years before joining this place and giving that side of metal another chance. I'm hooked on it now. Don't have much time for math metal bands like Dillinger Escape Plan though. Also haven't done much exploring into the worthwhile side of metalcore. As I've said many times my breakthrough was back in 2002 when my cousin showed me Pantera.

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On February 28, 2015 at 2:20 AM, jtb_brah said:

Hey guys, this is my first post here, but I've been lurking for a while now. Never posted before cause I never really had anything to say honestly. Metal hasn't always been my cup of tea, but since I started playing guitar around 7 or so months ago, my taste has gotten increasingly heavier. Before I played guitar, I had a friend that was what most people would consider a metalhead. He liked Metallica especially, but a little of all the the Big Four. He turned me onto metal, and Metallica has been one of my favorite bands ever since. I have a pretty eclectic music taste, but I still just could not get into the heavy stuff. For the past few months I have listened to basically nothing but Metallica and Slayer. I really liked it (more so than before), even though I used to hate Slayer. I kept searching, found this forum, and in doing so found some pretty heavy stuff, at least by my standards. I listened to some Amon Amarth, and that was it. The growling doesn't bother me any more, and I can start to hear some subtlety in the music. Hell, I even like a few Anaal Nathrakh songs, and they used to make my ears bleed. Looking for more songs and genres now, although from what I've heard I think I favor death/melodic death over black, doom, etc. I'm still open to anything though. Since a lot of you guys are veteran metalheads, try to think of some of the songs that turned you onto metal, if you don't mind. Almost forgot, Feel free to share your metal breakthrough. If (like most people) you didn't always like the hard stuff, what got you into it? What was some of the gateway music you listened to?

Since it's been more than a year now you might have heard these guys by now but if you haven't here are my favorite bands from my favorite genres,

black metal: dimmu borgir, dragonlord

thrash metal: havok, megadeth, testament, exodus, kreator, sepultura

death/tech death: Morbid angel, death, revocation, Amon Amarth, act of defiance

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I've always liked hard rock but the band that was sort of my gateway band was Foreground Eclipse. I really enjoyed their stuff so I started looking for music similar and looked into more metal music and that's how I got more into it. On another note if anyone has the time to go out of their way to listen to them would you tell me what subgenre they'd be considered? I still have no idea how to identify subgenres in metal.

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2 hours ago, guccimanefreed said:

I've always liked hard rock but the band that was sort of my gateway band was Foreground Eclipse. I really enjoyed their stuff so I started looking for music similar and looked into more metal music and that's how I got more into it. On another note if anyone has the time to go out of their way to listen to them would you tell me what subgenre they'd be considered? I still have no idea how to identify subgenres in metal.

I'd probably say they're metalcore/alternative metal. I only listened to one song though so I could be wildly incorrect.

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On 3/1/2015 at 2:20 AM, jtb_brah said:

Hey guys, this is my first post here, but I've been lurking for a while now. Never posted before cause I never really had anything to say honestly. Metal hasn't always been my cup of tea, but since I started playing guitar around 7 or so months ago, my taste has gotten increasingly heavier. Before I played guitar, I had a friend that was what most people would consider a metalhead. He liked Metallica especially, but a little of all the the Big Four. He turned me onto metal, and Metallica has been one of my favorite bands ever since. I have a pretty eclectic music taste, but I still just could not get into the heavy stuff. For the past few months I have listened to basically nothing but Metallica and Slayer. I really liked it (more so than before), even though I used to hate Slayer. I kept searching, found this forum, and in doing so found some pretty heavy stuff, at least by my standards. I listened to some Amon Amarth, and that was it. The growling doesn't bother me any more, and I can start to hear some subtlety in the music. Hell, I even like a few Anaal Nathrakh songs, and they used to make my ears bleed. Looking for more songs and genres now, although from what I've heard I think I favor death/melodic death over black, doom, etc. I'm still open to anything though. Since a lot of you guys are veteran metalheads, try to think of some of the songs that turned you onto metal, if you don't mind. Almost forgot, Feel free to share your metal breakthrough. If (like most people) you didn't always like the hard stuff, what got you into it? What was some of the gateway music you listened to?

I am what some would say is old school. Judas Priest,  Iron Maiden, Metallica, Kiss(hard rock), Megadeth, anthrax. However as I have gotten older I have been looking for new bands to listen to and add to my collection..

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great stories to hear!!!

My defining moment: 1983(?). Sitting in my friends house, who was the only kid in a 10 mile radius whose family could afford cable tv. We were flipping through using the big new channel box , and came across a video by the band Asia...Heat of The Moment. This caught our eye and ears, so we stayed on the channel. After this video, another one came on with the coolest drumbeat I had ever heard....then, that riff. These dudes with long hair, a killer looking metal-light rigged stage set; a guy with a blue sparkly bass...then the main riff; fast, chugging...the crazy drummer with super fast hands...and then the lead singer witht he full studded leather arm band..."The White Man Came, across the sea...." It was the Run to The Hills video, coming on in my firs t5 minutes of watching a verryy young MtV. My freind and I were hooked. Metal it was for me.

My gateway bands were Styx and Kansas, and my ultimate most favorite band: Rush. I already had  decent mane of 70's era "hesher-hair" going, but this was it.  I was in. Later that week, we raided my other friends older brothers album/cassette collection: Ozzy, Sabbath; Deep Purple, BOC, Van Halen, Judas Priest; Motorhead; Budgie....

moment 2:

later on that fall, I was at home listening to the radio when another song moved me forever....the opening strains of rushing wind, chirping birds...and then a haunting e minor to C picked chord progression and a mournful whistle...my ears perked up..then, the most AWESOME voice I had ever heard: "All alone, we walked this morning, A Light mist in the air..." I was transfixed as the "New Iron Maiden" as the DJ called them played The Lady Wore Black...Queensryche. Next level achieved. My freinds and I went out that weekend and bought the ep. I spent all my time in class learnign how to draw the font on the cover, and learning the drum and bass parts

moment 3:

the next summer...summer of 84,  I was at Boy Scout summer camp. I had smuggled in my electronic pride and joy into camp - my sony Walkman cassette player - and was hanging with some friends from my troop, when some kids from another troop saw our Maiden and Ozzy shirts, and came up and said "you guys like metal? Listen to this"...he flipped me a tape and I put it in. This cool sounding acoustic guitar riff came on. I thought it might be a new Ozzy song....then cymbal roll/swell/crescendo into....the fastest, most evil, brutal sounding thing I had ever heard...ever.  The double bass melted my brain... I think I remember just giggling uncontrollably, and thrashing around the picnic table....Fight Fire With Fire by Metallica had upped the ante...the world of underground thrash, speed, hardcore punk etc had opened up, and I was head first down the slide!!!

There have been millions of other "indoctrinations", and metal has been the central core of my being since I can remember.  

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5 hours ago, xUpTheIronsx said:

great stories to hear!!!

My defining moment: 1983(?). Sitting in my friends house, who was the only kid in a 10 mile radius whose family could afford cable tv. We were flipping through using the big new channel box , and came across a video by the band Asia...Heat of The Moment. This caught our eye and ears, so we stayed on the channel. After this video, another one came on with the coolest drumbeat I had ever heard....then, that riff. These dudes with long hair, a killer looking metal-light rigged stage set; a guy with a blue sparkly bass...then the main riff; fast, chugging...the crazy drummer with super fast hands...and then the lead singer witht he full studded leather arm band..."The White Man Came, across the sea...." It was the Run to The Hills video, coming on in my firs t5 minutes of watching a verryy young MtV. My freind and I were hooked. Metal it was for me.

My gateway bands were Styx and Kansas, and my ultimate most favorite band: Rush. I already had  decent mane of 70's era "hesher-hair" going, but this was it.  I was in. Later that week, we raided my other friends older brothers album/cassette collection: Ozzy, Sabbath; Deep Purple, BOC, Van Halen, Judas Priest; Motorhead; Budgie....

moment 2:

later on that fall, I was at home listening to the radio when another song moved me forever....the opening strains of rushing wind, chirping birds...and then a haunting e minor to C picked chord progression and a mournful whistle...my ears perked up..then, the most AWESOME voice I had ever heard: "All alone, we walked this morning, A Light mist in the air..." I was transfixed as the "New Iron Maiden" as the DJ called them played The Lady Wore Black...Queensryche. Next level achieved. My freinds and I went out that weekend and bought the ep. I spent all my time in class learnign how to draw the font on the cover, and learning the drum and bass parts

moment 3:

the next summer...summer of 84,  I was at Boy Scout summer camp. I had smuggled in my electronic pride and joy into camp - my sony Walkman cassette player - and was hanging with some friends from my troop, when some kids from another troop saw our Maiden and Ozzy shirts, and came up and said "you guys like metal? Listen to this"...he flipped me a tape and I put it in. This cool sounding acoustic guitar riff came on. I thought it might be a new Ozzy song....then cymbal roll/swell/crescendo into....the fastest, most evil, brutal sounding thing I had ever heard...ever.  The double bass melted my brain... I think I remember just giggling uncontrollably, and thrashing around the picnic table....Fight Fire With Fire by Metallica had upped the ante...the world of underground thrash, speed, hardcore punk etc had opened up, and I was head first down the slide!!!

There have been millions of other "indoctrinations", and metal has been the central core of my being since I can remember.  

Awesome stories! I love this sort of thing. 

Boy Scout summer camp in 1984. I have images of 'Friday the 13th' style clothes, attitudes and behaviours. Lots of scenes of America on television hahaha. 

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pretty much. The camp wasn't as creepy, but we looked the part, being a bunch of Midwestern middle class white kids...no girls at that camp though, but it was rough. Lots of great times playing the metal on our "snuck in" headsets. Also sitting around the picnic tables nerding out playing D&D and having  - what would have been considered cos-play now-a-days  - battles in the woods with sticks for swords and trash can lids for shields....

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For me it all started just over 10 years ago when I was about 12-13.  I didn't really have much knowledge of the genre at all (Guns n Roses was about as close to metal as I had ever experienced) and didn't have any particular interest in any other kinds of music either.  I did a lot of online gaming back in the day (more specifically WoW 8-)) and a few of the guys I played with got into the habit of playing Linkin Park through their mics for the rest of us to hear.  This sounds laughable now but at the time this was pretty much the heaviest stuff I had ever heard!  One day I found myself in a record store and decided to pick up one of their albums.  I listened to it pretty much on a constant loop, and looking back that's really what planted the seed.  From that point I was driven to discover more of this heavy, aggressive sounding music, and eventually graduated to the likes of Metallica, Maiden, Ozzy, Motorhead etc.

 

Since then I've explored the various sub-genres of metal and even today my tastes range from Sabaton, Volbeat, Ministry, Obituary and Celtic Frost just to name a small few.  But that's the long and short of how I came to be a metal fan - from some crackly background music to Slayer mosh pits :wink:.  Naturally I've moved on from Linkin Park but will always give them credit for bridging myself and many of the younger generations as a whole into the world of metal.

 

Metal is a wonderful genre that speaks to me in a way that no other kind of music ever will.  And behind the heavy sounds and "don't give a fuck" attitude that we all know and love I'd be hard pressed to find a scene/sub-culture that fosters such comradery and inclusion among its followers as metal does.

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