Jump to content

Whay about Acid Witch is not black metal?


GorboGorboze
 Share

Recommended Posts

I see on the Encyclopaedia Metallum that Acid Witch is described as psychedelic doom/death metal. What about this band is not simply black metal? I really dig this band by the way, and psychedelic doom sound like a genre right up my ally, so I don't mind hearing one of my favorite bands described that way, but I'm a little confused by it. And here is a little story that ought to maybe be placed in the Facts About Me thread. It is sadly a story about how I'm a bit of an insensate clod. I was listening to Acid Witch on youtube (sorry Acid Witch, one day when I am rich I will buy everything you publish) and working on my hookah craft project. Youtube turned over, which it does automatically for some reason, like it is fucking Songza or whatever, and started playing Bongripper, and guess what, yes you're correct, I didn't notice and listened to twenty four minutes of it with out realizing that it had happened. I've heard that album Wichtanic Hellucinations several time, just for the record, so there you go, I'm a bit of a clod. This story is a confessional, and I just thought you all deserved to know what It's really like with me, so there you go. Or maybe I was just caught up in my craft project, that can happen right? edit- Spelling error in the thread title... See, I told you I was a clod. edit- For crying out loud, what really happened is that I was listening to Windhand when it went into Bongripper and I failed to notice. That is not quit as bad I'm thinking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know, man, psychedelic doom/death pretty much nails it based on what I've heard. They basically have a bunch of chuggy, sort of Sabbathy riffs with cavernous growling and the odd effects-laden melody floated in on top. The guitar work alone places it pretty firmly in the doom camp IMO. I haven't heard a ton of this band, but I'm curious, what makes you think of black metal when you listen to it? Anybody specific? Or are you just reacting to some of the vocals and the overall reverb-y filth?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is as though I didn't follow the contentious argument you missed between BAN and an indignant youth who seems to be gone. Despite having read way to much of that thread I allowed myself to think that the subject matter made it black along with ,yes , the vocal style. So much for me really liking black metal I guess, but maybe there is hope for me in the death metal vein.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not black metal because it doesn't have the sinister atmosphere which typifies that genre. I haven't heard a lot by this band but what I have is pretty cool. Come winter I'll probably start adding some of their stuff to my ever expanding collection (assuming I can spare the cash).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Black metal is a pretty distinct sound that is hard to put into words. Some will use superficial characteristics to describe it, like that it uses super fast blast beats, tremolo picked guitars, and raspy vocals, but as only some black metal bands fit that mold, and those characteristics apply to other genres, they don't really tell you much. What it really has to do with is the atmosphere, chord progressions, note selection, and feeling that it evokes, but defining that is much harder to describe. My best advice would be to begin at the beginning with Venom, and follow the progression that it has made since then to really get what it is that makes the music black metal. If you'd like, I can chart a pretty solid progression for you with various points of evolution and modification that I think might help you get the idea.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I liked the cut from Venom called "Black Metal", I was exaggerating when I said that there was little chance of my getting very into Black Metal, or how ever it was that I put it. I'd read a charted progression of it's evolution with interest if you were to produce such a thing, thanks. Also I dig what you are saying about note selection, but there is this aspect to the music of Acid Witch especially in the cord progressions that is a little ungloomy and un-doomlike. I so very wish I had a good ear for cords, and really don't, but I'd hazard a guess that they throw in some augmented cords maybe 7th or 9th ones. I'm way out of my depth in that suggestion, but would feel very self satisfied if it turned out to be true. At any rate I imagine that what I'm referring to in their cord progressions is part of why the are called psychedelic, that and the crazy tone of the keyboards (a big part of what I like). Besides all that, I would like to add that I don't like blast beets, they are harsh and they are not emotionally expressive in my view, just kind of frenetic and mechanical. Another reason I like Acid Witch is that they have little or none of that. The thread seems to be in the wrong place in view of the discussion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I liked the cut from Venom called "Black Metal", I was exaggerating when I said that there was little chance of my getting very into Black Metal, or how ever it was that I put it. I'd read a charted progression of it's evolution with interest if you were to produce such a thing, thanks. Also I dig what you are saying about note selection, but there is this aspect to the music of Acid Witch especially in the cord progressions that is a little ungloomy and un-doomlike. I so very wish I had a good ear for cords, and really don't, but I'd hazard a guess that they throw in some augmented cords maybe 7th or 9th ones. I'm way out of my depth in that suggestion, but would feel very self satisfied if it turned out to be true. At any rate I imagine that what I'm referring to in their cord progressions is part of why the are called psychedelic, that and the crazy tone of the keyboards (a big part of what I like). Besides all that, I would like to add that I don't like blast beets, they are harsh and they are not emotionally expressive in my view, just kind of frenetic and mechanical. Another reason I like Acid Witch is that they have little or none of that. The thread seems to be in the wrong place in view of the discussion.
Much of my favorite black metal uses less blast beats than the more modern stuff, but I still love the technique, and would disagree about them not being expressive. I mean, we've all heard monotonous blast beats that just hold the pace with what seems to be the appropriate feel, but that can be said of any drum pattern. In any case, those are just techniques used to accomplish a certain feeling and add to what the song is trying to accomplish, and people often lose sight of that and focus on the technique itself. The same can be said for anything, doom isn't just about playing slow, death metal isn't just about brutality, etc..., but people get caught up with what's on the surface. As far as showing the progression of black metal, I would very much enjoy to do something like that. However, I have to warn you that brevity might be out of the question for me, and I might go a bit too in depth. So long as you don't mind me coming off like a professor, I can get it started, but it will likely be an ongoing project like my video recommendation archive.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it were up to me alone I would offer BAN the "Black Chair on the Global Hub" for Metal Music, but perhaps we should put together a committee to make that decision, I don't know, and I'm guessing there is no established protocol. As far a brevity goes, I'd say be brief if there isn't much to say. I for one will promise I'll let you know if it starts bore me. I am a visual learner though, so please include pictures. Please sign me up for the following class- Black Metal Evolution - The First Wave of the Darkest Darkness.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 years later...

Acid Witch is amazing, but they're definitely not black metal. Their slower, chugging, Sabbath-like riffs stand in direct contrast to the manic pace/tremolo picking of a lot of black metal bands. Even slower black metal, more atmospheric stuff, isn't anywhere near to Acid Witch.

The fact that you mentioned them though, makes me want to put on my "candy corn vinyl" copy of Evil Sound Sceamers as well as the fact that it's October.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Join Metal Forum

    joinus-home.jpg

  • Our picks

    • Whichever tier of thrash metal you consigned Sacred Reich back in the 80's/90's they still had their moments.  "Ignorance" & "Surf Nicaragura" did a great job of establishing the band, whereas "The American Way" just got a little to comfortable and accessible (the title track grates nowadays) for my ears.  A couple more records better left forgotten about and then nothing for twenty three years.  2019 alone has now seen three releases from Phil Rind and co.  A live EP, a split EP with Iron Reagan and now a full length.

      Notable addition to the ranks for the current throng of releases is former Machine Head sticksman, Dave McClean.  Love or hate Machine Head, McClean is a more than capable drummer and his presence here is felt from the off with the opening and title track kicking things off with some real gusto.  'Divide & Conquer' and 'Salvation' muddle along nicely, never quite reaching any quality that would make my balls tingle but comfortable enough.  The looming build to 'Manifest Reality' delivers a real punch when the song starts proper.  Frenzied riffs and drums with shots of lead work to hold the interest.


      There's a problem already though (I know, I am such a fucking mood hoover).  I don't like Phil's vocals.  I never had if I am being honest.  The aggression to them seems a little forced even when they are at their best on tracks like 'Manifest Reality'.  When he tries to sing it just feels weak though ('Salvation') and tracks lose real punch.  Give him a riffy number such as 'Killing Machine' and he is fine with the Reich engine (probably a poor choice of phrase) up in sixth gear.  For every thrashy riff there's a fair share of rock edged, local bar act rhythm aplenty too.

      Let's not poo-poo proceedings though, because overall I actually enjoy "Awakening".  It is stacked full of catchy riffs that are sticky on the old ears.  Whilst not as raw as perhaps the - brilliant - artwork suggests with its black and white, tattoo flash sheet style design it is enjoyable enough.  Yes, 'Death Valley' & 'Something to Believe' have no place here, saved only by Arnett and Radziwill's lead work but 'Revolution' is a fucking 80's thrash heyday throwback to the extent that if you turn the TV on during it you might catch a new episode of Cheers!

      3/5
      • Reputation Points

      • 4 replies
    • I
      • Reputation Points

      • 1 reply
    • https://www.metalforum.com/blogs/entry/52-vltimas-something-wicked-marches-in/
      • Reputation Points

      • 3 replies

    • https://www.metalforum.com/blogs/entry/48-candlemass-the-door-to-doom/
      • Reputation Points

      • 1 reply
    • Full length number 19 from overkill certainly makes a splash in the energy stakes, I mean there's some modern thrash bands that are a good two decades younger than Overkill who can only hope to achieve the levels of spunk that New Jersey's finest produce here.  That in itself is an achievement, for a band of Overkill's stature and reputation to be able to still sound relevant four decades into their career is no mean feat.  Even in the albums weaker moments it never gets redundant and the energy levels remain high.  There's a real sense of a band in a state of some renewed vigour, helped in no small part by the addition of Jason Bittner on drums.  The former Flotsam & Jetsam skinsman is nothing short of superb throughout "The Wings of War" and seems to have squeezed a little extra out of the rest of his peers.

      The album kicks of with a great build to opening track "Last Man Standing" and for the first 4 tracks of the album the Overkill crew stomp, bash and groove their way to a solid level of consistency.  The lead work is of particular note and Blitz sounds as sneery and scathing as ever.  The album is well produced and mixed too with all parts of the thrash machine audible as the five piece hammer away at your skull with the usual blend of chugging riffs and infectious anthems.  


      There are weak moments as mentioned but they are more a victim of how good the strong tracks are.  In it's own right "Distortion" is a solid enough - if not slightly varied a journey from the last offering - but it just doesn't stand up well against a "Bat Shit Crazy" or a "Head of a Pin".  As the album draws to a close you get the increasing impression that the last few tracks are rescued really by some great solos and stomping skin work which is a shame because trimming of a couple of tracks may have made this less obvious. 

      4/5
      • Reputation Points

      • 4 replies
×
×
  • Create New...