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RelentlessOblivion

Does humour have a place in music?

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5 hours ago, FatherAlabaster said:

Aww... you burned Johnny's only TON studio drum performance? :( Dead Again definitely had to grow on me. I also have the Bloody Kisses digipak, somewhere. I used to be much more into goth stuff in general. I still love some of that stuff... and I mean, Swans is one of my favorite bands ever, you can't get more humorless than that.

Yeah, Swans are about as humourless as it gets. Too weird for my taste, really.

That 'Bloody Kisses' digipak is glorious. I want it buried with me in my casket. 

It's no secret that Peter Steele was in a very dark place personally for the last ten years of his life, and you can sort of trace his mental descent through those last albums. A lot of the beauty and elegance was largely gone and the songs are really cold and cynical. Just not my bag.

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6 minutes ago, Requiem said:

Yeah, Swans are about as humourless as it gets. Too weird for my taste, really.

That 'Bloody Kisses' digipak is glorious. I want it buried with me in my casket. 

It's no secret that Peter Steele was in a very dark place personally for the last ten years of his life, and you can sort of trace his mental descent through those last albums. A lot of the beauty and elegance was largely gone and the songs are really cold and cynical. Just not my bag.

Swans are pretty strange, but they went through a lot of phases. I bet you could find something that would click if you were interested. I'd be happy to steer you in one direction or another. I'm not hugely into their newer stuff, although "To Be Kind" is really impressive. I have yet to check out "Glowing Man".

As far as cynicism goes, yeah, I see that with some of Pete's lyrics, but definitely not all - there's a lot of vulnerability on World Coming Down and Life Is Killing Me. Something about the lyrics seems more honest to me, even the goofy parts, and I prefer that to the cheesy pop sensibility of some of the mid-late 90s stuff. To each their own!

I've probably said it in here before, but I like humor in grind and death metal as well - early Cephalic Carnage slays me; I also enjoy the humor in some black metal, whether or not it's intentional. But in general I do tend to gravitate towards more serious and cerebral music.

It's a mood thing, I guess. I'm a moody guy.

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The only Swans albums I own are 'Soundtracks for the Blind' (scary and weird) and 'Children of God' (haunting and weird). Not sure I really want to delve further unless I'm missing something really special with them. Certainly nothing funny about Swans from what I've heard so far.

The best jokes are usually the unintentional, like the video for Immortal's 'Call of the Wintermoon'.  Classic stuff.

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"Children Of God" is probably my favorite - honestly, if you don't enjoy that album, you are missing something really special IMO. But that's not a criticism of you, I know they're an acquired taste. I don't know how far away from metal you'd veer, but some of their 90s material might do something for you. A lot of the best material from the late 80s-early 90s albums was collected on a 2-disc set called "Various Failures", and the best songs on there are transcendent to me - "Why Are We Alive" (the Various Failures version), "The Golden Boy Who Was Swallowed By The Sea", "Eyes Of Nature" are all prime cuts. You may dig "The Great Annihilator", too, it's more coherent and less overtly weird, with some truly beautiful sounds at times. I'll see if I can update my Swans thread with some new links.

But none of it belongs in the humor in music thread! Maybe it would be funny to post that stuff here anyway...

I have a hard time believing that Immortal video wasn't meant to be utterly hilarious.

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28 minutes ago, FatherAlabaster said:

 

I have a hard time believing that Immortal video wasn't meant to be utterly hilarious.

That's what's so goddamn funny about it hahaha. That witch guy running around bent over like that. And all the darting out from behind logs and rocks and things. Oh man what were they thinking? I reckon it's one of the funniest things you'll ever see on the internet. And I've been a massive black metal fan for 22 years so there you go.  

I remember reading an interview with Abbath much later and he was saying that the director just told them to run around in the forest, which he now regrets for obvious reasons. 

And here is the masterpiece in question:

Quote

 

 

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I think it´s a matter of balance and the occation. Sometimes humor can be the carrying thing and work great. Gems like Massacration and Alien fucker ie.. There are some artists who wish to make a statement, or tell a story, or just give serious food for thought so it´s understandable that it will not fit in for every artist. The way i see it, some humor here and there is a valuable trait, when you take yourself too seriously all of the time it must be exhausting.

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IF  many layers of societal sarcasm is funny, then yes. Humor or not I do like to get  that at least in some sense, the band is enjoying themselves, and there is some type of fun to convey.

That dont smile, thats not metal business is BS.

Lemmy used humor on stage. Song lines like,"It was them it was not me," are pretty tongue in cheek funny. And I do enjoy them.

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On 27/12/2016 at 7:57 AM, GrayscaleDawn said:

Forgot to mention this band that greatly benefits from humor too.. 12 foot ninja. They are pretty awesome! :)

 

 

This is hilarious. They play in Melbourne all the time but I've never seen them - maybe I should check them out. A good friend of mine really loves them. 

I think to understand the humour here you sort of have to be Australian. Everywhere you go people ask you if you've been busy. No joke, I went to the dentist the other day and the guy goes, "How have you been?" and as I open my mouth to answer he says, "Busy? Yeah, busy". It was so funny. Afterwards my wife and I made a point of commenting on it to each other as we had both noticed the verbal idiosyncrasy. 

So yeah, very funny stuff if you're an Austraaaaaalian. 

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Come to Australia and you'll see plenty of people that the video parodies, that's for sure hahaha. But yeah, I'm sure it has a lot of cross-cultural value. Great video. 

In fact I just sent a text to that friend I mentioned to say I saw the video and he texted back, "You been busy mate???" hahaha

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The 12 Foot Ninja video reminded me of another bunch of Australian nutjobs, King Parrot. They have a similar little opening vignette, albeit slightly more sinister. 

There's certainly something about bogan Australians that works well with humour. 

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I am a fan of serious music.  However I do like humorous music like DR. Demento type stuff (I was a kid once)

I have been told that I shouldn't make people laugh when we do live shows, but people seem to like it when I make them laugh.  I think it's fun.

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Yes I think it's good to have humour in music, like you said metal especially takes itself way too seriously and its good to have bands in the genre that are there for comic relief (Alestorm is the best example for me)

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On 4/10/2019 at 12:14 PM, luke192 said:

Yes I think it's good to have humour in music, like you said metal especially takes itself way too seriously and its good to have bands in the genre that are there for comic relief (Alestorm is the best example for me)

But should humour be taken seriously? 

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